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New York Style Meatballs | Gizzi Erskine

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Hi FoodTubers! Gizzi’s back with a classic meatball recipe that’ll blow your socks off! A thick and creamy tomato sauce poured over juicy garlicky pork and beef …

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  1. “Too much garlic! Garlic everywhere,”
    Garlic, you see, is not quite the staple of Italian cuisine Americans think it is. Depending on who you speak to, onions are a controversial ingredient too – and don’t even think of ever combining the two in a single dish.
    After all, Americans are messing with their grandma’s grandma’s grandma’s recipes.
    Is Spaghetti and Meatballs Italian?
    . And, nothing says Italian food like a big bowl of spaghetti and meatballs—unless you are Italian.
    If you go to Italy, you will not find a dish called spaghetti and meatballs. And if you do, it is probably to satisfy the palate of the American tourist.
    Yes, Italy has its version of meatballs called polpettes, but they differ from their American counterpart in multiple ways. They are primarily eaten as a meal itself (plain) or in soups and made with any meat from turkey to fish. Often, they are no bigger in size than golf balls;
    But those large meatballs, doused in marinara over spaghetti are 100 percent American. So how did spaghetti and meatballs evolve from polpettes?
    Pasta is a ritual for Italians. You can mess with anything but not the pasta. There are some rules that come with cooking pasta, rules that you never change.” Pasta is always al dente (very slightly undercooked). • You finish cooking pasta in its sauce after you have drained it from the boiled water; you never dollop the one on top of the other. “Pasta and its sauce should be combined like salad and its dressing,”

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